food

No Fuss Breakfast Topper

Gluten free. Nut free. Refined-sugar free.

My main advice to patients about choosing a healthy breakfast is to pick or create something low in sugar, high in fibre, with adequate protein and loaded with healthy fats.

The typical go to is eggs and veggies. But not everyone has the time for a cooked breakfast each day. Eggs can get boring after a while and some can’t eat them due to an allergy. Likewise with nuts, which also features regularly in my breakfast recommendations.

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So I have been inspired to create a recipe that is super convenient for busy folk, ticks all the macronutrient requirements and is suitable for those who have food allergies and intolerances. Say hello to my omega-packed, protein dense seed blend, which can be made in bulk and conveniently added to fruits in the morning for a kick-arse breakfast.

You could purchase a pre-made one from the health food store, or you could make your own and save a tonne of money. Plus, this way, you can be guaranteed you aren’t consuming sneaky added sugars, which is in almost ALL pre-made nut and seed breakfast blends.  

I recommend visiting your local bulk food store to purchase the appropriate quantities of each of the ingredients below. A batch should be made fresh every 2-4 weeks to minimise damage to the oil rich seeds and prevent eating stale puffs (yuck!)


Recipe

Makes 10-20 serves

Appropriate serving size is ¼ - ½ cup

For the batch above, I used raisins and puffed quinoa.

For the batch above, I used raisins and puffed quinoa.

Combine the following:                                                                      

¼ cup chia seeds

¼ cup hemp seeds (optional)

½ cup pumpkin seeds

½ cup sunflower seeds

½ cup linseeds

½ cup raisins or dried cranberries. Omit for a completely sugar free option.

1 cup buckwheat kernals

1 cup puffed quinoa, millet or amaranth

 

Store in an airtight container in a cool place.


By Naturopath Lucy Mason 

FOOD INTOLERANCE: Why you might not be stuck with it for life!

FOOD INTOLERANCE: Why you might not be stuck with it for life!

For some people, foods considered ‘healthy’ can trigger an adverse response in the body. A reaction to wholesome foods such as fruits and vegetables should ring alarm bells – it’s your body’s way of communicating to you that something isn’t right inside. Food intolerances are typically treatable if the cause is identified. But first, let’s take a look at the difference between food allergy and intolerance, and become familiar with the symptoms of each.

Defining food allergy

Food allergy occurs when a susceptible individual has an immune reaction to a food, causing the release of immunoglobulins (antibodies) and other chemicals into the bloodstream. These immune chemicals can cause the lips, mouth and tongue to swell, an itchy rash (hives) to develop, vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal cramping and respiratory difficulties. Generally only a small amount of the food is needed to cause an immune response, and in severe cases, the food only needs to be touched or particles inhaled for a reaction to occur.

Common food allergens include peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, egg, wheat, soy, milk, mustard and sesame. Allergies are usually identified in childhood, however they can develop at any age. Many childhood allergies are outgrown as the immune system develops. Some allergies, such as shellfish and peanut, typically persist into adulthood.  

Food allergy vs. food intolerance

A food allergy can lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis and strict avoidance of the allergen follows diagnosis. Food intolerance is not life threatening and diagnosis or management may involve a food challenge i.e. bringing the food back into the diet. Due to these differences, the distinction between allergy and intolerance is important in individuals who suspect their symptoms (or their child’s symptoms) relate to food.

How to spot food intolerance

Many people live with the symptoms of food intolerance without realising that food is the culprit, as reactions can vary greatly in type and severity between individuals, so it is not easily recognisable. Some people experience food intolerance predominantly as digestive symptoms such as bloating, nausea or diarrhoea, while others may feel lethargic, get headaches, acne or skin rash.

For some, symptoms come on quite quickly after eating, making the troublesome food easier to spot. However for many others, the symptoms can be delayed or inconsistent from day to day. Intolerances are usually dose dependent, which means the more you eat of the offending food (or food group), the worse the reaction.

The bottom line – identifying food intolerance can be complicated. Some diagnostic testing is available through a practitioner, though it is costly and limited. Keeping a food diary that clearly documents foods eaten and the timing of symptoms can help uncover which foods make you unwell.  A health practitioner who is familiar with food intolerance can help step you through an elimination and challenge diet, to better determine problematic foods and your threshold for reactions to that food.

The Common Culprits

As a naturopath, I’ve seen some wacky reactions to unexpected foods in clinic, however there are particular foods that are commonly problematic:

·      Gluten – an umbrella term for the proteins found in wheat, rye barley and oats. The symptoms of gluten intolerance (also referred to as non- coeliac gluten sensitivity) typically appear hours or the day following gluten consumption. Headache, fatigue, brain fog and achiness are among the most common symptoms.

·      Lactose – the sugar found in dairy products. Foods particularly high lactose includes milk, cream, soft cheeses, commercial yoghurts and ice cream. The intolerance is usually caused by lack of the digestive enzyme lactase, leading to symptoms of abdominal cramping, bloating and diarrhoea, which appear quite quickly after eating lactose.

·      Histamine – an amine that occurs naturally in many aged and processed foods including wine, cheese, pate, meat broth and fish. The common symptoms of food histamine intolerance include flushed, itchy skin, nasal irritation, nausea, reflux, headache and irritability.  

·      Salicylates – found naturally in colourful fruits and vegetables, salicylate intolerance is often one that is overlooked. In children, salicylate intolerance often appears as a red rash around the mouth and behavioral issues. In adults symptoms can range greatly, from digestive discomfort to mood issues.

·      Fructose – the sugar found naturally occurring in fruits, as well as a common sugar additive. Fructose malabsorption is a genetically inherited inability to absorb fructose. Free fructose in the intestine causes water to flood into the space, leading to diarrhoea. Fermentation of the sugar by bacteria and yeasts can also lead to gas and bloating.

·      FODMAPS – a group of carbohydrate fibres found in many fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes and nuts. The symptoms of FODMAP intolerance resemble those of irritable bowel syndrome e.g. bloating, burping, cramping, diarrhoea and/or constipation. A common underlying cause for FODMAP intolerance is small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).

·      Food additives such as flavours, colours or preservatives can affect mood, digestion, respiration and the skin. Some examples include MSG, sulphites, nitrates, benzoates and the artificial sweetener aspartame.

What all food intolerances have in common

All food intolerances have their origin in the gut, whether it is in the small intestines, liver or colon. Some common reasons why intolerances develop include:

·      Lack of liver or intestinal enzymes to break down the particular food, which can be due to a range of nutritional and genetic factors.

·      An imbalance of bacteria in the gut (termed dysbiosis) or bacteria overgrowing in the small intestine (SIBO), causing the improper processing of foods (typically sugars and carbohydrates such as fructose, lactose and other FODMAPs)

·      Having a leaky gut, which exposes food particles to the immune system which otherwise would not make contact.

Given there is generally an underlying reason why intolerance has developed, it stands to reason that if the causal gut issue is corrected, the intolerance will resolve. My experience as a health practitioner has seen many patients’ reintroduce problematic foods after years of restrictive diets. Healing the gut completely by identifying unique issues to the individual is the key to successfully reversing food intolerance. It is often a tricky and involved process, which requires patience and perseverance. With the right attitude and right practitioner guiding you, you don’t have to be stuck with food intolerance for life.

Lucy

BHSc (Naturopathy) with Distinction

Prebiotics for health

The exciting possibilities of prebiotics for a variety of digestive, immune and mood related complaints are only just being discovered. Prebiotics are receiving more attention with the increasing understanding of the human microbiota (all of the bacteria, viruses and fungi that live on and in us), as the two together can have an incredible impact on our health.

 

What are prebiotics?

Essentially, prebiotics are ingredients found in whole, unprocessed vegetables, fruits, legumes, grains, nuts and seeds which are not digestible to us, but provide the perfect food for beneficial gut bugs living within us(1). These ingredients are broken down by the microorganisms in the digestive tract into compounds that have a beneficial effect in multiple areas of the human body, which can include altering the activity of the same bugs that created them! Most prebiotics are carbohydrate fibres, and it’s the knock-on effect of eating them that makes them so special.

 

How do they relate to probiotics?

I often hear prebiotics being confused with probiotics. While they act very similarly in the gut, they are in fact different. Probiotics are live organisms that we take in supplement form, where the species of bacteria are known and measured(2) Much like the gut bugs that have been living in us since the first few days of life (our microbiota), probiotics also love to munch on prebiotics. You will often find probiotics and prebiotics in combination in a supplement to enhance the products therapeutic quality. A lot of the research around prebiotics looks at how they interact with two of the most common probiotics, Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria(3).

 

What’s the difference between fibre and prebiotics?

Most prebiotics are fibre, however not all fibres are prebiotic. Fibre is often classified as insoluble or soluble, which also provides a good basis for distinguishing which ones are prebiotic.

Insoluble fibres do not get broken down by us or by our gut bugs, however they do bulk out the stool, helping to keep us regular(4). These are the stringy fibres that give a lot of foods their rough texture, such as the skin of nuts, seeds, fruits and vegetables.

Soluble fibre, found in a variety of whole foods, cannot be broken down by us, but are easily fermented by bacteria. Those that exert a proven beneficial effect on us are termed prebiotics.

 

Types of prebiotics

Here is a little bit of extra information for the science lovers out there. A clear cut catagorisation of what is and what isn’t a prebiotic has not yet been established as it is still a young area of science. If we consider what has the potential for prebiotic activity, the following fibres and their respective foods are included:

  • Non-starch polysaccharides such as beta-glucans (mushrooms), pectins (pear, apple, plum, citrus), gums (guar gum, xanthum gum), hemicellulose (psyllium husk) and cellulose (broccoli, cabbage, kale, cauliflower).
  • Non-digestible oligosaccharides such as galactans (legumes) and fructans, primarily inulin (onion, garlic, artichoke, asparagus, leek, chicory root, banana).
  • The disaccharide lactulose (only found in supplement form).
  • Sugar alcohols including sorbitol (pears, plums, dried fruits) and mannitol (button mushrooms).
  • Resistant starch, which is starch that resists digestion in the small intestine, making it available in the large intestine for fermentation (potatoes, legumes, whole grains).
Prebiotic gut health

How do prebiotics improve our health?

Prebiotics selectively stimulate the growth of beneficial bacteria that are indigenous to our guts, including the well-studied Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli species. These bacteria, when thriving, help to seal the barrier between the intestine and bloodstream, improve our immunity and keep potential bad bacteria/fungi (such as clostridia and candida) to a minimum.(3). With a healthy microbiota, improvements are noted in mood, skin, allergies and autoimmune conditions, just to name a few.

In addition, bacteria create short chain fatty acids (e.g. butyrate, propionate and acetate) from prebiotic fibres, which have beneficial effects throughout the body. For example, butyrate, made by Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae bacteria, is a major energy source for the cells that make up our colon. Propionate acts at the liver to suppress cholesterol synthesis and acetate is utilised by the heart, brain, kidneys and muscles(1).

 

When prebiotics can be problematic

For people that have certain intestinal issues, such as Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) or Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), eating the wrong types of prebiotics can make symptoms worse. For example, fructans and sugar alcohols (which are both considered FODMAP foods) are known to cause bloating, flatulence and discomfort in certain people(5). However, complete avoidance of prebiotics deprives healthy gut bugs of food and can make the situation worse in the long run. If you fall into the SIBO or IBS, or are unsure, an appointment with us can help minimise symptoms while still making sure your good bugs are fed! 

By Lucy Mason

BHSc (Naturopathy)

Warm sweet potato and lentil salad

This gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan and vegetarian friendly recipe, developed by our naturopath Rachel, is the perfect meal or side dish to your favourite protein. 

There are so many elements to this salad that nurture and support your gut health with our favourite being fibre!

Adequate intake of fibre for men is 30g/day and women is 25g/day (1), which most Australian's fail to meet (2). High fibre intake is proven to have health-protective effects and disease-reversal benefits including heart disease, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and certain gastrointestinal diseases (3). Resistant carbohydrates and dietary fibre, from sources like sweet potato and lentils, influences the variety and number of bacteria we have in our gut, as well as their bacteria's metabolic abilities (4), which influences so many aspects of our health, including mood and immune function. So dig in to this delicious recipe and feed your gut some fibre.

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Serves 4-5. Preparation and cook time 1-hour 20min

Ingredients

  • 800g sweet potato cut into 2 cm cubes
  • 2 cloves crushed garlic
  • 1 ½ C bite sized broccoli florets
  • 150g snow peas, cut into thirds
  • 1 can (400g) brown lentils, drained and rinsed
  • 1-2 handfuls of rocket
  • Coconut oil 
  • ½ lemon juiced
  • 2 tsp seeded mustard
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Feta or parmesan (optional)

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees celsius.
  2. Add sweet potato to a lined baking tray and coat in coconut oil, garlic, salt and pepper. Place baking tray in oven and bake for 1 hour or until golden brown.
  3. In a large bowl add snow peas, rocket and lentils. Sit this aside.
  4. To make the salad dressing, in a small bowl add lemon, mustard, olive oil, oregano, salt and pepper. Stir until combined and pour into the large bowl.
  5. After the sweet potato has been in the oven for 45 minutes, add the broccoli florets to the bake try and bake for the remaining 15 minutes.
  6. After the baked vegetables are done, add them to the large bowl and mix well.
  7. Serve in your favourite plate or bowl with the option of adding your favourite parmesan or feta.

Dish created by Rachel Larsson

Fermented Beet Kvass

One of our favourite gut loving recipes is beet kvass. Beet kvass is type of fermented drink, you know, similar to kefir or kombucha. Kvass has so many health benefits and is great for your gut. Due to it's fermentation process it is a wonderful source of probiotics which can help the health of your gut and immune system, it is also rich in antioxidants with is excellent for your liver. Using beetroot is traditionally known for it's blood cleansing properties, in addition to being a great source of nutrients.

Kvass typically has a tangy, salty flavour which can be an acquired taste. Using beetroot also gives it a wonderful earthy flavour. If beetroot isn't your thing, you can use other foods to ferment like fruits (strawberries and raisins) and herbs (mint). 

 Ingredients        

  • 2-4 organic beetroot
  • 1-2 tsp sea salt or Himalayan salt
  • Filtered water
  • A few tablespoons whey, dripped from yoghurt or milk kefir (optional)
  • 1-1.5 litre glass jar

Directions

1. Wash unpeeled beets and chop into large cubes

2. Place beets in a jar and add salt and optional whey (if not using whey add an extra tsp of salt)

3. Fill jar with filtered water, you want to cover the beetroot by at least two inches

4. Seal with lid and leave on the counter at room temperature for 4-7 days to ferment (4-5 days in summer)

5. Transfer to fridge

6. Have about ¼ cup daily on own or dilute with water

Image: Courtesy of CERES Fair Food.

Image: Courtesy of CERES Fair Food.

Our top 23 recommendations to avoid the hidden toxins in your diet

We had such a great response to our part one blog series looking at the hidden toxins you may be putting IN your body. We left you with some healthier alternatives to help you reduce your exposure. The post had us all brainstorming, sharing and discussing what we do in our own homes that help keep our toxin consumption to a minimum. We were so excited about our new learnings that we thought "why not share this with everyone?!" So here you are. These are some of our favourite brands, products and places we shop that will help you get through this modern day chemical maze.  

1. Additive free foods. For a lot of us this is particularly hard to find alternatives in the snack department, as it's so easy to grab a packet of something and run out the door. Try these instead:

  • You have probably heard of bliss/energy/protein balls and have been handed several DIY recipes, but what if you don't have the time or creativity? Funch has made it so much easier. All you need to do is add one or two ingredients and you are done.
  • If you want the most delicious nuts and seeds, try 2die4. Based in Byron Bay, these guys have a wide range to choose from single types, mixed, paleo and tamari. Yum! 
  • Botanical Cuisine, a Melbourne company, has nailed the market of raw, vegan, preservative free dips that are perfect for veggie sticks. Some of their dips can also be used as a dressing, spread or added to scrambled eggs! 

2. Clean cooking with perfluorochemical free cookware.

  • Le Creuset has a massive range of cookware from pots, pans and bakeware in a variety of materials.
  • If you are after a slow cooker for soups, stews or bone broths try this one by Breville.

3. Glass containers and jars to store and reheat food.

  • Buying things in jars mean you have jars to re-use for storage. Looking in our pantries, we all laughed about the over-abundance of glass jars we have in our homes!
  • Alternatively, IKEA and Kmart have affordable options.

4. To avoid trans fat you need to throw out the margarine and anything called a 'vegetable spread', think Nuttelex and Flora. Store bought and packaged baked goods are also hidden sources. Alternative products include:

  • Butter from Organic Dairy Farmers as it is certified organic and supports local farmers. Other alternatives for spreads we love are avocado, Spiral's unhulled tahini, or Artisana's deliciously creamy cashew butter.
  • For those times you want to treat yourself, get inspired by one of the many margarine free recipes by The Healthy Chef!   

5. Healthy cooking oils we are a fan of:

  • SOL Ghee is made from 100% certified organic unsalted butter from Australian and New Zealand grass fed cows.
  • Coconut oil options are endless! You want to buy the least modified oil, look for these words on the packaging: certified organic, virgin, extra-virgin or unrefined, unbleached, expeller, centrifuge or cold pressed. We also prefer glass packaging to avoid BPA. Brands that tick all these boxes include Loving Earth and Niugini Organics.

6. Our go-to fish and sea vegetable products are:

  • This Fish is a health and environmentally conscious brand. They are organic and use sustainable source for their products. 
  • Power Super Foods have a great range organic sea vegetables including dulse, wakame and nori.
  • If you like making your own sushi Gold Mine have excellent nori sheets!

7.  The best organic whole food stores in Melbourne. They are stockists for so many of the products we have mentioned.

  • Visit Apples and Sage Organic Wholefoods, this is an amazing, certified organic, family owned business located in Balwyn. Known in the area as a friendly, affordable, one stop shop destination.
  • Terra Madre Organics is a local favourite and organic institution, known for its huge bulk range at bulk prices.
  • Wild Things in Fitzroy values everything we do; community, local, organics and the environment. 

BONUS TIPS

  • Looking for a great water filter? Southern Cross Pottery have filters of all shapes and sizes to remove some of the nasties in your water. Waters Co Bio Mineral offer great compact, portable water filter jugs too. 

If have any products, shops and brands you passionate about we would love you to share it with us!

The perks of pregnancy; what you can do to help your morning sickness

There's nothing like a personal experience to help give some perspective on what my patient's might be going through. I'm not going to lie, my first four months pregnancy has been tough! Fatigue and all day nausea and vomiting is exhausting, not to mention unpleasant. I went through all sorts of feelings during this time, while being absolutely over the moon to be growing a baby, it was difficult to stay positive while having to stay so close to a bucket and carry a sick bag everywhere I went! I felt the guilt that I wasn't supplying my growing bub with adequate nutrition. All I wanted to eat was fruit, something I generally try to limit to one serve per day, and even supplements were difficult to keep down. 

Pregnancy Diet

My advice:

1. Don't be too hard on yourself. A few months of a less than ideal diet isn't going to undo all the good nutrition you put in prior. So far in my pregnancy, I ate a lot more fruit than I would usually, but it's better than nothing! And now that the nausea is over (thank goodness) I am weaning myself off slowly and increasing my intake of nutrient dense foods like eggs, meats and butter (things I went off completely for a few months). 

2. Eat little and often. I wasn't great with this one and would often forget or get too busy to eat. Preparation is key here, have ready to eat snacks on hand - nuts, fruit, vege sticks or rice crackers with hummus/pesto work well.

3. Try healthy foods in different forms. I usually don't eat too many raw vege's in winter but veggie sticks with hummus was the only way I could get my veg in. 

4. Preconception care. If you can, aim to spend 3-6 months preparing your body for pregnancy. This should include personalised advice from a qualified practitioner, a super nutrient dense diet for both mum and dad and prenatal vitamins and minerals.

5. Correcting nutrient deficiencies such as vitamin B6 and zinc. This is easier to do prior to pregnancy to potentially prevent morning sickness and should be part of your preconception care.

From one mum-to-be to another, good luck!
 

Abi Walker

BHSC Naturopathy, PGDIP Dietetics, BSC Human Nutrition

The hidden toxins in your life and how to avoid them

With the arrival of Holistic Skin Naturopathy at Narayani Wellness, we have been thinking about all the products we commonly put on our skin. As holistic practitioners, we also start thinking about the bigger picture, and consider what we put in and around our bodies that affects not only our skin, but also our overall health. Due to the industrial age we live in, our exposure to toxins has increased exponentially over the past decades. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the chemicals present in air, water, soil, food, building materials and household products are toxicants that contribute to many chronic diseases we see in clinical practice (1).

Fortunately, you do have some say in the amount of toxins you are exposed to, especially within your home. To help you out and give your spring clean a bit of a kick-start we have broken this HUGE topic into a three part blog series: in, on and around.

 

Part one 'in'

Of the large list of things we could discuss, here are some common toxins you may be unknowingly putting IN your body. 

1. Bisphenol A (BPA) is an industrial chemical product used in plastics and resins of food and drink packaging e.g. drink/water bottles and the lining of canned foods. BPA leaches toxins into our food and is worse when heated (2). It is an endocrine disruptor, which means it has a nasty effect on your hormone levels. For men it is linked to lower sexual function, semen quality (3), prostate disease and prostate cancer (4). In women it has been linked to breast cancer and reproductive difficulties (5). Exposure has also been associated with obesity, heart disease and behavioural problems (3,6)

2. Phalates are synthetic chemicals found in plastics commonly, and are additives for various other applications (7,8). The main concern with phalates is that they are endocrine disruptors that interfere with the hormones that regulate our reproductive and nervous system (9). Exposure during pregnancy is concerning, as it has been associated with shorter pregnancy duration, smaller babies and lower birth weight (10). Other negative effects include poor thyroid function and respiratory problems including asthma (11).

3. Perfluoro chemicals are used to make products stable and durable. They can be found in the coatings of cookware and in products where fats and oils are prevented from soaking through, such as popcorn bags and greaseproof paper (12). Animal studies suggest it is toxic to the immune system and liver, and has a negative impact on blood lipids, thyroid hormones and sex hormone production (13). Human exposure is connected to lower birth weight and birth length and obesity later in life. Like BPA, these chemicals impact our reproductive system and are linked to poor sperm quality in men, and problems with conceiving and irregular menstrual cycles for women (14).

4. Trans fats are a type of unsaturated fat produced by vegetable oils being hydrogenated (combined with hydrogen). They are used to improve food texture and stability (15) in products like deep-fried fast foods, bakery products, packaged snack foods and margarines. Trans fats have a terrible effect on our blood lipids and cholesterol, inflammation and blood vessel health. It also increases the risk of many cardiovascular diseases as well as diabetes and insulin resistance (16).

5. Heavy metals are naturally occurring elements, however arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury are a concern as they have a high degree of toxicity. Heavy metals are everywhere, but become problematic when we consume contaminated water and food such as seafood, non-organic and canned foods. Health impacts, depend on many factors and include negative effects on our nervous, immune and cardiovascular systems. They are also linked to kidney damage, diabetes, osteoporosis, mental illnesses like depression, hearing loss and various types of cancer. These metals can also interfere our metabolism of iron, calcium, copper and zinc (17).

6. Non-organic food deserves a whole discussion! However, to demonstrate our point, the following example is how only ONE chemical used on non-organic food can impact your health (brace yourselves).

Glyphosate-based herbicides, such as Roundup®, are the most widely used across the world (18, 19). Consuming non-organic foods is our main source of exposure (20). This herbicide negatively affects our gut flora and gut lining and is linked to irritable bowel disease. Its health effects are wide and varied as it is also linked to cancer, unhealthy liver function, obesity, anaemia, infertility, mental illnesses like depression, ADHD and autism, nervous system conditions like Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis (21)

7. Food additives are substances that are added into or onto food and to effect its keeping quality, texture, consistency, taste and colour (22). Processed and packaged foods (23) e.g. canned, jarred, boxed and wrapped, are commonly full of additives. Consumption has been linked to severe allergic reactions, asthma, eczema, dermatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, migraines, behavioural disorders and hyperactivity (24).

Hidden toxins

Safer alternatives

Thankfully, we have some solid take home messages and safer alternatives to get you through our modern day toxic maze.

1. Minimise / remove packaged and processed foods.

  • Simple changes like swapping a muesli/snack bar for a small handful of nuts or store bought salad dressing for extra-virgin olive oil and lemon juice.

2. Invest in cookware that is ceramic, cast iron, stone, glass or stainless steel. If you are after non-stick ensure it is perfluorochemical free.

3. Use glass: glass jars and containers to store and reheat food.

4. Throw out the margarine and avoid store bought and packaged baked goods. Healthier options include butter or coconut oil for cooking and avocado, cashew butter or tahini as a spread.

5. When using fats or oils in cooking, opt for duck fat, ghee and coconut oil as they have higher temperature of resistance before they oxide and go rancid. The higher the saturated and monounsaturated fats are better. Avoid cooking with high polyunsaturated fats.

6. Eat deep-sea small fish to minimise heavy metal consumption. If you eat sea products like kelp and nori, ensure they are organic. 

  • Consume anchovies, cod, crab, flounder, haddock, hake, mackerel, perch, salmon, sardine, trout and whiting.
  • Avoid bluefish, bassa, grouper, marlin, shark, swordfish and tuna.

7. Eat organic foods when possible.

 

Until part two of this series, we will leave you with a final question. What changes will you implement this week?