gluten free

Low FODMAP frittata

Gluten free. Low FODMAP. Great for families.

Looking for a quick and easy meal to prepare for a family on the low FODMAP diet? This recipe has it all! Packed full of FODMAP friendly veggies, this frittata incorporates the carbohydrate of pumpkin (in an appropriate quantity) and the protein of eggs to keep you and your loved ones full and satisfied. It can be eaten hot or cold and stores in the fridge for a couple of days for a quick meal prepared in advance.  

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Serves 4

Ingredients

Frittata:

  • 10 eggs

  • 1 cup of water

  • 1 small red capsicum, diced

  • 1 zucchini, diced, seeded part removed

  • 1½ cups (about 300g) of kent or jap pumpkin, diced

  • 2 cups of spinach or kale, diced

  • 1 fresh tomato, sliced

  • 10-20 sprigs of chives,

  • ½ cup grated parmesan cheese

  • 2-3 Tbsp pepita seeds

  • 1 tsp of salt

  • ½ tsp of black pepper

To serve:

  • 2 head of broccoli (approx. ½ cup per serve)

  • 2 cup of green beans (½ cup per serve)

  • Olive oil


Method:

  1. Roast, steam or boil the pumpkin until just soft

  2. Whisk eggs in a large bowl

  3. Add cooked pumpkin and all other raw frittata ingredients, minus the pepita seeds and sliced tomato. Stir until evenly combined.

  4. Pour mixture into an appropriately sized oven-proof dish (frittata should be about 5-7cm thick) that has been lined with baking paper or greased with olive oil. Cook for 20 minutes at 170 degrees C.

  5. Lay the sliced tomato and sprinkle the pepita seeds over the almost cooked frittata and return to the oven for a further 20 minutes.

  6. Check the frittata is cooked through, remove from the oven and cut the frittata into

  7. Serve with steamed greens dressed with olive oil.

No Fuss Breakfast Topper

Gluten free. Nut free. Refined-sugar free.

My main advice to patients about choosing a healthy breakfast is to pick or create something low in sugar, high in fibre, with adequate protein and loaded with healthy fats.

The typical go to is eggs and veggies. But not everyone has the time for a cooked breakfast each day. Eggs can get boring after a while and some can’t eat them due to an allergy. Likewise with nuts, which also features regularly in my breakfast recommendations.

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So I have been inspired to create a recipe that is super convenient for busy folk, ticks all the macronutrient requirements and is suitable for those who have food allergies and intolerances. Say hello to my omega-packed, protein dense seed blend, which can be made in bulk and conveniently added to fruits in the morning for a kick-arse breakfast.

You could purchase a pre-made one from the health food store, or you could make your own and save a tonne of money. Plus, this way, you can be guaranteed you aren’t consuming sneaky added sugars, which is in almost ALL pre-made nut and seed breakfast blends.  

I recommend visiting your local bulk food store to purchase the appropriate quantities of each of the ingredients below. A batch should be made fresh every 2-4 weeks to minimise damage to the oil rich seeds and prevent eating stale puffs (yuck!)


Recipe

Makes 10-20 serves

Appropriate serving size is ¼ - ½ cup

For the batch above, I used raisins and puffed quinoa.

For the batch above, I used raisins and puffed quinoa.

Combine the following:                                                                      

¼ cup chia seeds

¼ cup hemp seeds (optional)

½ cup pumpkin seeds

½ cup sunflower seeds

½ cup linseeds

½ cup raisins or dried cranberries. Omit for a completely sugar free option.

1 cup buckwheat kernals

1 cup puffed quinoa, millet or amaranth

 

Store in an airtight container in a cool place.


By Naturopath Lucy Mason 

The top 5 questions I get asked about gluten

Due to the abundance of information available and our habit of asking Dr Google for answers, there is a lot of confusion around gluten and if it is ‘good’ or ‘bad’ for you. I’d like to give you some evidence-based information that may help you decide the role of gluten in your diet by answering five of the most frequently asked questions I receive. 

1. What is gluten and where is it found?

Gluten is a structure that is made up of hundreds of proteins, notably gliadin and glutenin, and is found in grains like barley, durum, semolina, wheat, farina, kamut, rye and spelt grains(1). Many of these grains are used to make breads, pasta, cakes, pastries, and biscuits to give them their fluffy or stretchy texture. Gluten is used as an additive in processed foods to improve texture, flavour and moisture retention. Some foods where gluten may be hiding include vegetarian meat substitutes, confectionary, ice -cream, butter, seasonings, sauces, marinades and dressings(2). All in all, gluten plays a large role in the standard Australia diet and is delicious!

2.What’s the difference between Coeliac Disease and Non-Coeliac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS)?

Coeliac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease in genetically susceptible individuals that is caused by eating gluten(3). Classic symptoms include diarrhoea and failure to thrive within the first couple of years of life. You may experience other symptoms or no symptoms at all and can still have CD. CD is diagnosed through a biopsy of the small intestine but may be detected in blood tests that look for specific immune markers(4).

Non-coeliac Gluten sensitivity (NCGS) occurs in people who are not affected by CD or a wheat allergy. The biggest difference between NCGS and CD is that there is a different immune response to gluten and there isn't the complete destruction of your gut villi (finger like projections important for nutrient absorption)(5,6). NCGS symptoms occur hours to days after eating gluten and can disappear when gluten is removed. Classic symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, bowel habit abnormalities, foggy head, headache, fatigue, joint and muscle pain, dermatitis, depression and anaemia(7). Clinically we see increased intestinal permeability aka ‘leaky gut’ confirmed on blood or urine testing underlying NCGS.

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3.Does gluten cause leaky gut?

In short, yes.

In susceptible individuals, when you eat gluten, the tight junctions (gate-like structures in your gut wall) are told to open-up as a result of an increased release of zonulin. Zonulin acts as a signal that says ‘open up please!’ to your gut wall. When gluten is removed from the diet, zonulin levels decrease which causes the immune system to calm down and healing to begin. It’s very important when healing leaky gut to follow a strict gluten-free diet, as the smallest amount of gluten will trigger a zonulin release(8).

4. What are some gluten-free alternatives?

There are many grains that are gluten-free including amaranth, buckwheat, corn, millet, quinoa, rice, sesame, sorghum and teff. Products like arrowroot, lentils, rice and tapioca can produce gluten-free flour and thus to some extent replace wheat flour(1). Luckily in 2018 there is much more awareness around the need, desire or demand for gluten-free products so there are many delicious alternatives available. It is worth noting that there is great variation the quality of the gluten-free alternatives in regards to nutrient, protein and fat content and glycaemic index (how much they impact your blood sugar levels)(9). My advice is to go wholegrain where you can or at the very least, have them with nutrient dense, protein and fat rich toppings, fillings or sauces.

5.What about oats are they gluten free and can I have them?

Gluten is a complex mixture of hundreds of proteins (called prolamins), notably gliadin and glutenin. Similar prolamins exist as secalin in rye, hordein in barley, and avenins in oats and are collectively referred to as “gluten”(10).

Avenin in oats contain a smaller amount of an amino acid called proline, which is higher in some of the other proteins mentioned in wheat, barly and rye. Lower proline content may be why oats are less immune reactive compared to wheat, but may still be a problem in large quantities. Oats may still activate specific immune cells in 10% of CD patients so it may be wise to avoid oats as part of your gluten free diet (11).

Furthermore, it is common for oats to be farmed and milled with wheat and are therefore contaminated with gluten. It is possible that pure, uncontaminated oats, can be made into products that contain less than 20mg of gluten per kg, making it potentially safe in a gluten free diet (12).  One commonly recommended brans of gluten-free oats is Bob’s Red Mill.

Final thoughts

There is so much more to be said about gluten and how it may affect your health, so if you still feel unsure about gluten in your diet, please reach out to us at Narayani Wellness to receive some personalised guidance. Our support can help a potentially confusing path be more simple and accurate for you!

By Rachel Larsson, Naturopath

Gut Loving Banana Bread

Gluten free. Dairy free.

After more than four years of experimenting with a gluten free diet, and three years of adhering to it strictly, I am so excited to be sharing with you one of my favourite gluten free go-to recipes. No gluten means it is kind on your intestinal lining, which can become “leaky” with exposure to gluten (see our other blogs for more info). This bread is moist, it’s filling and it’s packed full of goodness. The almond and linseeds offer a great source prebiotic fibres to keep our gut bugs happy, as well as being rich in minerals and healthy oils (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, especially omega-3, omega-6 and omega-9).

If you’re going gluten free there a few staple flours you will need to have in your pantry for baking. Almond meal, tapioca flour and brown rice flour are all great to have on hand, which can be bought by weight from whole-food stores such as The Source or packaged from health food stores, or the health section of the supermarket. Be sure to keep your almond and linseeds stored in a cool place during the summer, to avoid oxidation and spoilage of the healthy oils within. Note that some of the healthy oils within nuts and seeds are lost in the baking process, but cooking will not cause them to go rancid and spoil in the way that improper storage can.

I hope you enjoy this bread as much as I do!

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Ingredients:

  • 2 large banana (ripe or overripe)
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 Tbsp coconut oil, melted
  • 2 Tbsp honey (optional)
  • 1 cup nut milk
  • 1 tsp cinnamon (optional)
  • 2 tsp gluten free baking powder
  • ½ cup almond meal
  • ½ cup ground linseeds/flaxseeds
  • ½ cup rice flour (brown or white)
  • ½ cup tapioca flour

Method:

  1. Mash the bananas in a large bowl
  2. With a fork whisk in the eggs, coconut oil, honey and nut milk
  3. Stir in the remaining dry ingredients
  4. Pour into a lined rectangular bread/cake tin
  5. Bake in the oven (175 degrees C) for approx 50 minutes, or until cooked through.

By Lucy Mason, Naturopath

Choc Mint Cheesecake Swirl

Created by Rachel Larsson

Have you ever found that when you have decided you are ‘going to get healthy’ or you are determined to ‘feel better’, an all-or-nothing approach to food can sometimes make the process a whole lot harder?

Food has many roles and meanings; it’s nourishing, fuel for your body, a way to socialise and a source of enjoyment.

Food shouldn’t be a source of anxiety, guilt or fear.

Whatever diet you choose to follow that best supports you in your ability to thrive, I hope there is room for delicious treats to enjoy in moderation (there certainly is in mine)! 

I wanted to share with you a recipe that is delicious and you can enjoy without guilt, remorse or regret. It is perfect for Christmas (or any occasion for that matter) and you’ll have your family & friends begging for more.

The best part is - it is gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free, vegan/vegetarian friendly and refined-sugar free, but tastes just like a rich, classic cheesecake.

You’re welcome guys!

Ingredients

Base

  • 2/3 cup medjool dates
  • 1 cup raw hazelnuts ground
  • 1/2 cup linseed/flaxseed meal
  • Pinch of salt
  • 2 tablespoons of coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup cacao nibs

Filling

  • 600ml full-fat coconut cream
  • 3/4 cup cashew butter*
  • 1/3 cup coconut oil, melted + additional 1/4 cup
  • 1/4 cup rice malt or maple syrup 
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1/4 cup raw cacao powder
  • 4-8 drops of peppermint extract/essence (more or less depending on personal preference)
  • 12-20 baby spinach leaves or 2-3 drops of green food dye (depending on how green you want the mixture).

Decoration

  • Dark chocolate, melted
  • 1-2 tablespoons cacao nibs (optional)
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Method

1. Line a cake tin with baking paper

Making the Base

2. In a food processor add ground hazelnuts, linseed/flaxseed meal, dates, coconut oil and salt to a food processor and blend until crumbly in texture. Add in cacao nibs and blend until they are mixed in.

3. Evenly press mixture into the cake tin, and place tin in freezer for 10 minutes

Making the Filling

4. In a blender/nutribullet add coconut cream, cashew butter, 1/3 cup coconut oil, maple/rice malt syrup and salt. Blend until combined.

5. Split the filling into two even quantities.

6. To one half of the mixture add cacao powder and blend until smooth.

7. Pour this cacao filling into the base and set in the fridge for 10 minutes (until slightly firm).

8. Whilst the chocolate filling is starting to firm, make the mint filling.

9. Add to remaining half of the mixture baby spinach leaves or green food dye, remaining coconut oil and peppermint extract/essence and blend until smooth.

10. Carefully pour the mint filling onto the chocolate mixture gentle swirling with the handle end of a spoon, to create a swirled chocolate and mint design.

11. Place in fridge overnight

Decoration

12. Take the dessert out and drizzle over your melted dark chocolate to create a decorative pattern. Whilst the chocolate is still wet, sprinkle over some cacao nibs for an extra crunch.

13. Serve, sit back and wait for the smiles

Notes

*I made my own cashew butter using soaked 1 ½ cups of cashews, soaked in water for 24 hours. I then drained these and blend in a Nutribullet (or something similar) until smooth – adding some water one tablespoon at a time to help.

Storage. This dessert will last 3-4 days in the fridge, a few months in freezer.

Coconut and Buckwheat Toasted Muesli

Gluten free. Oat free. High protein. High healthy fats.

Your body will love you for starting your day with this well balanced breakfast. Many typical breakfasts are high in carbohydrate and sugar - a nightmare for your pancreas and adrenals. Nuts, buckwheat and coconut form the core of this recipe, providing the right macronutrients (protein and healthy fat) that prevent your blood sugar levels from spiking, keeping your hormones (insulin and cortisol) happy. It is my go to on the days where I don’t feel like eggs and avocado or I need a breakfast with minimal preparation - it’s quick, filling and tasty.  

Shop bought muesli is often loaded up with oats (not so great for those of us avoiding gluten) and can contain high amounts of sugar. It only takes 30 minutes to put together a homemade toasted muesli that lasts a couple of weeks, and you can personalise it to your taste and needs!

I love to serve it with fresh berries and a blob of natural pot set yoghurt or a drizzle of almond milk. It’s also great to nibble on by itself as a snack throughout the day.

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Ingredients

  • 1 cup whole buckwheat kernels/groats
  • 2 cups roughly chopped nuts and seeds of your choice
  • (I like almonds, cashews, brazil nuts, pepitas and sunflower seeds)
  • 1.5 cups coconut flakes
  • 1.5 cups puffed millet (I have also used puffed rice or amaranth in the past with success)
  • 3 Tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 3-4 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 Tbsp rice malt syrup

  Method

  1. Combine all dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl.
  2. Melt the coconut oil in a small pan and add rice malt syrup. Stir until combined then remove from the heat.
  3. Mix the oil mixture through the dry mixture until everything is coated.
  4. Spread the mixture out on lined baking trays, so that it is no thicker than 1cm.
  5. Bake in the oven on 120 degrees C for 20 minutes, turning once, or until the mixture is lightly golden in colour.
  6. Wait until the mixture is completely cool before packing it away for storage in the pantry.

Created by Lucy Mason, Naturopath

Low FODMAP Winter Warming Soup

You have just discovered the low FODMAP diet and your tummy is feeling much better for it, but traditional Winter food feels so bland without onion and garlic! It doesn’t have to. This delicious soup uses ginger, chilli and high quality chicken stock to give it some serious flavour. These warming ingredients are perfect for cold Winter nights, and the mix of fresh veggies makes it light, healthy and refreshing.

Not only will low FODMAP be gentle on your tummy, but the gelatin in the chicken stock may aid the healing of a leaky gut, which often accompanies FODMAP issues. At Narayani Wellness we encourage the use of high quality organic chicken broth, as pesticides accumulate in connective tissue and are therefore often found in high quantities in non-organic meat broths. You can make your own organic broth or buy it ready made from most health food stores. For a vegan/vegetarian variation of this soup, substitute chicken stock with a homemade veggie stock. Tofu, tempeh or boiled eggs could be used instead of poached meat.

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Serves 3-4. Preparation and cook time 30-40 minutes.

Gluten free, dairy free. Vegan/vegetarian option.

Ingredients:

  • Thumb sized piece of fresh ginger, finely grated
  • One fresh chilli finely chopped (seeds removed)
  • 1 tbsp oil (we like olive, coconut or ghee)
  • 1 large carrot, grated
  • 1 large zucchini, seeds removed and grated
  • ½ large capsicum, thinly sliced
  • 4 stalks/1 cup broccolini, chopped
  • 500g organic meat of your choice (I used chicken drumsticks) (optional)
  • 1.5 L organic chicken stock
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Fresh coriander to serve

 Method

  1. In a large pot, saute the chilli and ginger in oil for 2 minutes on medium-high heat
  2. Add the chicken stock.
  3. If using meat, add it now to poach in the stock
  4. Remove the meat with tongs once cooked through and place on a cutting board to cool
  5. Turn pot down to a simmer, add the vegetables and cook until just soft
  6. Meanwhile, shred the cooked meat with a couple of forks or chop into small pieces
  7. Add the meat back to the pot
  8. Serve into bowls, salt and pepper to taste and top with fresh coriander!

Created by Lucy Mason

BHSc (Naturopathy)

Warm sweet potato and lentil salad

This gluten-free, dairy-free, vegan and vegetarian friendly recipe, developed by our naturopath Rachel, is the perfect meal or side dish to your favourite protein. 

There are so many elements to this salad that nurture and support your gut health with our favourite being fibre!

Adequate intake of fibre for men is 30g/day and women is 25g/day (1), which most Australian's fail to meet (2). High fibre intake is proven to have health-protective effects and disease-reversal benefits including heart disease, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and certain gastrointestinal diseases (3). Resistant carbohydrates and dietary fibre, from sources like sweet potato and lentils, influences the variety and number of bacteria we have in our gut, as well as their bacteria's metabolic abilities (4), which influences so many aspects of our health, including mood and immune function. So dig in to this delicious recipe and feed your gut some fibre.

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Serves 4-5. Preparation and cook time 1-hour 20min

Ingredients

  • 800g sweet potato cut into 2 cm cubes
  • 2 cloves crushed garlic
  • 1 ½ C bite sized broccoli florets
  • 150g snow peas, cut into thirds
  • 1 can (400g) brown lentils, drained and rinsed
  • 1-2 handfuls of rocket
  • Coconut oil 
  • ½ lemon juiced
  • 2 tsp seeded mustard
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Feta or parmesan (optional)

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees celsius.
  2. Add sweet potato to a lined baking tray and coat in coconut oil, garlic, salt and pepper. Place baking tray in oven and bake for 1 hour or until golden brown.
  3. In a large bowl add snow peas, rocket and lentils. Sit this aside.
  4. To make the salad dressing, in a small bowl add lemon, mustard, olive oil, oregano, salt and pepper. Stir until combined and pour into the large bowl.
  5. After the sweet potato has been in the oven for 45 minutes, add the broccoli florets to the bake try and bake for the remaining 15 minutes.
  6. After the baked vegetables are done, add them to the large bowl and mix well.
  7. Serve in your favourite plate or bowl with the option of adding your favourite parmesan or feta.

Dish created by Rachel Larsson